Minority Doctoral Fellowships help foster diversity in education


To help increase the number of CPAs from diverse backgrounds teaching at the college and university level, the AICPA has awarded 22 scholars the Minority Doctoral Fellowship.

The Fellowship, funded by the AICPA Foundation, provides $12,000 each to full-time minority accounting scholars who have demonstrated the potential to become accounting educators.

The Fellowship is available to ethnic minorities who have obtained or plan to pursue a CPA license and who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The 2014–2015 AICPA recipients are:

  • Herita A. Akamah, University of Oklahoma
  • Brandon D. Ater, Virginia Tech
  • Maurice Atkinson, Michigan State University
  • Joye L. Baugh, Jackson State University
  • Lydia N. Didia, Jackson State University
  • Brent A. Garza, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Michelle Harding, University of Virginia
  • Oscar J. Harvin, Florida Atlantic University
  • Chevonne Herring, University of Mississippi
  • Ethan G. LaMothe, University of South Carolina
  • Thomas F. Lewis Jr., Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Makila C.A. Major, University of Memphis
  • Sydnee Manley, University of Mississippi
  • Rachel Martin, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Christopher Alan Miller, University of Mississippi
  • Patricia Navarro, University of Central Florida
  • Porschia Nkansa, University of Memphis
  • Rebeca Perez, University of Oregon
  • Genese Rogers, Morgan State University
  • Delvin D. Seawright, Morgan State University
  • Justin Cole Short, University of Tennessee
  • Kecia Smith, Texas A&M University

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