Unforgettable passwords

By J. Carlton Collins, CPA

Q. What are the minimum criteria for creating a strong password?

A. Microsoft provides a Password Checker website, where you can enter the password to check its strength, an example of which is pictured below.

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To achieve the maximum strength, Microsoft’s password checker requires at least 14 characters containing at least one of each of the following types of characters: an uppercase letter, a lowercase letter, a number, and a special character. As added security, most experts also recommend that passwords not contain your username, real name, company name, or complete words; that each password be unique; and that all passwords be significantly different from previous passwords.

Because the above rules result in a bevy of passwords that are difficult to remember, I use a different approach that you may want to consider. All of my passwords start with the same lengthy prefix, such as a childhood telephone number, for example, 9126364242 (this is not the actual prefix I use). Next, my passwords all include the name of the account, such as Delta, Amazon, or AICPA. Finally, each of my passwords ends with a four-digit personal identification number (PIN). The results are strong lengthy passwords that I have a good chance of remembering, such as the examples shown below (which are not my actual passwords):

Delta account password:      9126364242delta7543

Amazon account password: 9126364242amazon9312

AICPA account password:    9126364242aicpa2209

Using this approach, the bold PINs are all I need to remember, and because hackers don’t know the actual lengthy prefix I use, these passwords are very strong. With 263 active passwords on my list, this structured approach gives me a fighting chance of remembering many of them. Because uppercase and special characters are more difficult characters to type (especially on a smartphone device), I avoid these types of characters unless they are required. 

J. Carlton Collins is a technology consultant, a CPE instructor, and a JofA contributing editor.

Note: Instructions for Microsoft Office in “Technology Q&A” refer to the 2013, 2010, and 2007 versions, unless otherwise specified.

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