Quantum may bring unhackable cryptography

Featuring David Cieslak, CPA/CITP, CGMA, executive vice president and chief cloud officer, RKL eSolutions


Video transcript:

You think about IT security today and how it’s just a constant struggle. If we can actually bring computing resources to bear, specifically quantum computing resources to bear, and create a security system that cannot be broken, that’s pretty much life changing.

It uses something called vector cryptography, which is very complex. Vector cryptography is going to require more computing resources than a binary approach would take today, but quantum in fact would support. Today, we can’t really do vector-based cryptography. With quantum, vector-based cryptography, which is that kind of highest level of encryption, that encryption that can’t be broken, that becomes available to us once we have the computing power of quantum.

The hackers will definitely have access to quantum computing capabilities today and going forward, and that’s why we’re almost kind of on a footrace to make certain that we’re implementing more secure systems that have the power of quantum, and by the way, machine intelligence and machine learning, deep learning behind that, so we’re able to kind of create a system where we’re understanding what the threat vectors are, applying essentially a very high-powered computing against that.

The question is, what about the hackers? Aren’t they going to have access to quantum computing as well? Yes, but the notion is, as best we can tell, vector-based cryptography as yet cannot be broken.

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