Keys to writing a great job description

Featuring Sarah Dobek, president and founder of Inovautus Consulting


Video transcript:

There’s three things that I think are important to writing a good, attractive job description today. First and foremost, if you don’t understand who your ideal target employee is, you need to understand that first. You need to understand what attributes make somebody successful within your culture and then within your environment. If you don’t understand that, you can’t write a job description to attract that person. The second thing is you actually need some copywriting. This is a sales tool. So you need to have a really good copywriter that can tell your story. The person reading this or listening to this job description needs to be able to see themselves in this position. So you need to talk about what the contributions are that they will be making, and I’m not talking about job responsibilities and ticking off a task list of, I’m going to perform these functions, but how are they going to be helping your clients? What’s their role in the team going to be? You need to be speaking to that. That’s what’s attractive to candidates. It’s not the other stuff. We’ve A/B tested job descriptions both ways. The former with being able to appeal to them in what they can contribute is far more results-oriented in generating applications than something else. The last thing is I think you need to blow up the job description and not just think about it in a written format. Today, we have audio and we have video. Consider having people tell the story about what this position is going to be and really turn it on its head. Don’t just write the job description. You can get a transcript from any type of audio or video format that you might do, but consider the format that you’re delivering this in and leverage technology today to help you deliver that message.

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