How to get started as a PFP

Featuring Steve Klane, CPA/PFS, and Ryan Genor, CPA/PFS


Video transcript:

Steve Klane, CPA/PFS
Owner, Klane Wealth Management

I would say the very first thing is do what I did, that is come to the AICPA Advanced Personal Financial Planning conference. And you have to get a feel of all of the education, of all the different courses of what’s involved.

But the key learning is in the get-togethers and in the hallways and having the kind of the assertiveness to say to different practitioners, “What do you do? What is your business model? How did you start?” And have your list of questions and ask 10 people that and be bold.

Read everything you can. Go to the AICPA PFP website. Learn everything that is involved in being a financial planner.

Ryan Genor, CPA/PFS
Adviser, CLS Financial Advisors

The things that I needed to do in order to make the transition included additional education, getting the PFS credential, seeking out additional resources in the industry — the personal financial planning section of the AICPA is a great resource — going to conferences. All of these resources were very helpful in allowing me to personally gain the knowledge that I needed in order to, you know, provide good service for my clients.

For more information on personal financial planning, visit aicpa.org/pfp

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