Quantum leap coming for computing power

Featuring David Cieslak, CPA/CITP, CGMA, executive vice president and chief cloud officer, RKL eSolutions


Video transcript:

Really, computing up until now has worked in a binary sense, ones and zeros, on or off, and it’s really been the same computing model for 50, 60, 70 years that we’re all kind of working within. Quantum computing really takes all of that and turns it on its ear. We have some new concepts that come into play. One’s called superposition, one’s called entanglement, and it really takes this notion of binary and says, you know what, we can do more with that. It has everything to do with maybe a piece of information. It can have both a one and a zero state simultaneously and kind of how one relates to another, called entanglement, can come into play. It really can take computing to a whole new level.

They describe computing power in a quantum world in something called qubits. Qubits, today, Google has a chip commercially available that’ll handle about seven qubits per second. Once we get to about 100, that’s probably when we’ll get to really a point where we can have something that’s commercially viable.

How does that impact the accountant or any user? I think probably one of the neatest places where this is going to come into play is it gives us the ability to do what I’ll call encryption that can’t be broken, so in other words, impervious, or essentially invincible encryption.

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