Distribution by former S corporation is part dividend

By Sally P. Schreiber, J.D.

In Rev. Rul. 2019-13, the IRS ruled that a distribution to the sole shareholder of a C corporation was partly a recovery of the former S corporation’s accumulated adjustments account (AAA) and a taxable dividend for the remaining distribution.

The company involved was originally a C corporation that had accumulated earnings and profits (E&P) of $600x when it converted to an S corporation. (The sole shareholder held all 100 shares of stock in the corporation.) When the corporation terminated its S election, it had an AAA of $800x and continued to have the $600x of C corporation E&P.

During the corporation’s S corporation post-termination transition period, the corporation redeemed 50 of the 100 outstanding shares for $1,000x. The corporation made no other distributions during the post-termination transition period. Pursuant to Sec. 302(d), the redemption is characterized as a distribution subject to Sec. 301. For the tax period that includes the redemption, the corporation had current E&P of $400x.

The IRS ruled that if, during a former S corporation’s post-termination transition period, the corporation

distributes cash in redemption of a shareholder’s stock, which is characterized as a distribution subject to Sec. 301, the corporation should reduce its AAA to the extent of the proceeds of the redemption pursuant to Sec. 1368. Consequently, the IRS ruled that $800x of the distribution should first reduce the S corporation’s AAA under Sec. 1368 (which was not taxable) and that the remaining $200x was a taxable dividend under Sec. 301.

— Sally P. Schreiber, J.D., (Sally.Schreiber@aicpa-cima.com) is a JofA senior editor.

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