AICPA Foundation scholarship recognizes outstanding incoming college freshmen

Ten incoming college freshmen received the first-ever AICPA Foundation High School Scholarship.

Recipients must have completed courses taught by educators who participated in the AICPA's Accounting Program for Building the Profession: Advanced High School Accounting (known as the Accounting Pilot and Bridge Project), which trains high school educators to teach higher-level accounting curricula.

Recipients also must attend a two- or four-year accredited college or university on a full-time basis and maintain a GPA of at least 3.0. Students may be nominated by an educator or school counselor registered on the AICPA's Start Here, Go Places. website or be nominated by a current AICPA member.

The recipients, who receive $2,000 each to be used toward their education, are listed below with the high school where they completed the Advanced High School Accounting course and the college they're attending:

  • Lexus Gonterman, Central Hardin High School, Georgetown College
  • Kaylee Johnson, Summertown High School, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
  • Andrew Kozan, Salem High School, Siena Heights University
  • Alexandra Lamoree, Farragut High School, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
  • Hayley Newman, Silver Creek High School, Indiana University
  • Alec Olinger, Silver Creek High School, University of Southern Indiana
  • Luke Quinney, Jim Ned High School, Texas A&M University
  • Scott Rothschild, Council Rock High School North, The George Washington University
  • Ronald Walton, Central High School, Middle Tennessee State University
  • Lauren Zambon, Canton High School, Central Michigan University

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