Ethnically diverse accounting students attend leadership workshop


The Institute’s 2014 Accounting Scholars Leadership Workshop graduating class consisted of 114 students who successfully completed a two-day program designed to strengthen their professional and success skills, while highlighting the career possibilities that becoming a CPA can offer.

The annual invitational workshop is open to ethnically diverse accounting and finance majors who plan to pursue the CPA license. The AICPA Foundation covers the cost of the attendees’ transportation, hotel accommodations, and meals.

This year’s workshop was held at four locations in partnership with the state CPA societies in Florida, Kansas, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. The program featured speakers such as Frank K. Ross, co-founder of the National Association of Black Accountants; Jason Orme, chair of the Oregon Society of CPAs; and Ken Strauss, immediate past chair of the Florida Institute of CPAs.

The students also participated in interactive sessions on topics including preparing for the CPA exam, behavioral assessments/unconscious bias, navigating corporate culture, financial literacy, and the value of networking and community involvement.

A list of this year’s graduates is available at tinyurl.com/mfofyq3.

The workshop is open to ethnic minorities who are sophomores, juniors, seniors, or fifth-year or graduate students who have declared a major in accounting, finance, or tax with an intent to pursue the CPA credential. Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA, be actively involved in campus and community activities, and be a Student Affiliate Member of the AICPA as well as a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. For more information on applying for next year’s workshop, visit ThisWayToCPA.com/ASLW.

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