Out of touch

By J. Carlton Collins, CPA

Q: I bought a touchscreen monitor for my desktop, but I find that I seldom use its touchscreen capabilities. Is it just me, or am I missing something? Are touchscreen monitors really useful?

A: I have found the touchscreen interface to be crucial for smaller mobile devices but less important for desktops and laptops. I suppose that if I added keyboards and mice to my tablet and smartphone devices, I would use them over the device’s touchscreen controls; but this solution would be less mobile, which defeats the primary purpose of mobile devices. In addition, keyboards and mice require a flat surface to operate, which also undermines mobility. In the final analysis, I agree with you; unless more useful touchscreen-centric applications emerge, I’d say that touchscreen technology is less necessary on a desktop computer than on a mobile device.

J. Carlton Collins (carlton@asaresearch.com) is a technology consultant, CPE instructor, and a JofA contributing editor.

Note: Instructions for Microsoft Office in “Technology Q&A” refer to the 2013, 2010, and 2007 versions, unless otherwise specified.

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