Sweet savings

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS, CPA

Q: When I purchase merchandise on the web, I often see an option to enter a discount code on the checkout page, but I never seem to have one. I’ve tried searching the web for discount codes that I might use, but I never seem to find codes related to my purchase. Is there a website that maintains a list of current discount codes that might be usable?

A: I, too, have found that searching for purchase discount codes rarely yields satisfactory results, but I do have one recommendation worth trying. A free website called Honey requires no personal information and maintains a large database of up-to-date discount codes. ( Note: This solution only works with the Google Chrome and Firefox browsers.) To use this solution, launch Google Chrome or Firefox (if you do not have Google Chrome or Firefox installed, you can download and install them at tinyurl.com/7st238h or tinyurl.com/3ck8ycb, respectively), visit joinhoney.com, and then click either the Install for Chrome or Install for Firefox button, as shown in the previous column.

 

Thereafter, shop as you normally would, and when you check out, click the Honey Find Savings button to initiate a search of available discount codes. If savings are found, Honey will enter the code automatically.

 

Honey continuously monitors the web for new promotions and coupon codes, and harvests codes that have been successfully used by others. In addition, several hundred online retailers provide discount codes to Honey—including Amazon, Banana Republic, Best Buy, Gap, Home Depot, Kohl’s, Macy’s, Old Navy, Sears, Target, Walgreens, and others. This solution does not always yield discounts, but I have saved from 10% to 30% on several occasions.

 

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