That's a Shifty Move

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS

Q: Because I live in a rural area, slower Internet access is my only option, but I still do a great deal of reading on the Web. The slower connection makes it frustrating to click back and forth between the articles and the main page because I have to wait for the main page to reload each time. Is there a way to speed up my browser?

 

A: Here is an easy solution that works in Internet Explorer, Firefox and Google Chrome. The next time you click a hyperlink on your main page to read a news story, hold down the Shift key. This will cause the news story to launch in a new browser window. When you are done reading the news story, close the browser window, and the original browser window containing the main page will remain intact. In the example below, I’ve clicked the “News Release” hyperlink on the FASB website, while holding down the Shift key. This launched the article in a separate browser window.

 

Another measure you might consider is setting your page refresh setting to Never. This will cause Web pages that you visit to be cached on your computer hard drive. The next time you access that same Web page, it will launch immediately from your computer instead of slowly from the Internet.

 

To adjust this setting in the Internet Explorer browser, choose Tools, Internet Options, and click the Settings button in the Browsing History section. Check the radio button labeled Never under the Check for newer versions of stored pages and click OK. The downside of this is that you must remember to refresh the Web page manually (by pressing the F5 key) whenever you want to view the current version of that Web page; otherwise, you might be reading an older version of the Web page and not realize it.

 

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