Creating a New Worksheet Can Be a Drag

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS

Q: How can I insert new worksheets in my Excel workbook without having to constantly set up headers and footers in those new worksheets?

 

A: Excel 2003, 2007 and 2010 allow you to duplicate a worksheet by holding the Ctrl key down and dragging the worksheet’s tab to the left or right. This action will insert a new worksheet, complete with the same headers, footers, margins, column widths, and cell contents, as the original worksheet. (In many situations, this method is quicker and easier than inserting a new worksheet and then adding headers, footers, margin settings and content.)

 

Alternative approach: To achieve the same results using the menus, select a worksheet tab (or group of tabs), right-click on that worksheet tab (or group of tabs), select Move or Copy from the pop-up menu, check the Create a copy box, and click OK.

 

Hint 1: Using the menu approach described above, you could also copy and create a duplicate worksheet in another workbook.

 

Hint 2: To duplicate multiple worksheets at the same time, select the first worksheet to be duplicated by clicking on the worksheet tab. Next, while holding down the Shift key, select the last worksheet to be duplicated by clicking on its tab. (This action will select those two tabs and all worksheet tabs in between.) Copy the group of worksheets by holding the Ctrl key down and dragging the group of worksheet tabs to the left or right.

 

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