Create Your Own Lookalike Office 2003 Toolbar and Add It to the Ribbon

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Q I’ve just switched from Office 2003 to Office 2007, and although it’s clearly more powerful, I’m not enamored with the Ribbon. I waste loads of time in frustrating searches through its scattered maze of functions. Isn’t there some way I can keep the Office 2007 muscle but go back to the efficient 2003 toolbar? Do you have any ideas for streamlining the task of searching through those Ribbons?

 

A In this case you can have your cake and eat it. Check out the screenshot below in which I’ve created what amounts to a customized (albeit abbreviated) Office 2003-like toolbar attached to the bottom of the Ribbon for easy access. If you want, you can even make the Ribbon disappear, leaving only the dozen or so oft-used functions in your Quick Access Toolbar right on top of whichever Office application you’re running.

 

Not only can you choose which functions to add, but you also can arrange them from left to right in any order. Plus you can add the file’s full name and path—a little touch Microsoft left out of the Ribbon.

 

The default position of the Quick Access Toolbar is above the Ribbon. I suggest you place it below for easier access. To do that, right-click on the Quick Access Toolbar and then on Show Quick Access Toolbar Below the Ribbon (see screenshot below).

 

To add tools, click on the icon at the right edge of the Quick Access Toolbar (see screenshot at right).

 

That will open the screen on the left. Then click on More Commands…, which in turn opens an array of choices (see screenshot below). I suggest you press the menu button next to Popular Commands so you can choose from the All Commands list. To select a command, highlight it and then press the Add>> button.

 

Later, to arrange each command in your preferred left-to-right order, highlight any icon you wish to move and then press either the up or down button.

 

 

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