Layoff Survivors' Relief Turning to Stress


At first, workers who survive layoffs may feel grateful and relieved to still have their jobs. But, as workloads and anxiety over job security increase, those feelings can quickly turn to stress and burnout.

 

According to a nationwide survey of 4,400 workers by CareerBuilder.com, 30% of layoff survivors feel burned out. And it’s no wonder since nearly half of the survivors (47%) said they had taken on more responsibility due to layoffs, and more than one-third (34%) said they are now spending more time at the office.

 

If you’ve survived a layoff and are feeling overwhelmed, try these tips to keep your stress level in check:

 

  • Don’t overpromise. If two or more projects come up at the same time, work with your supervisor to prioritize your to-do list and come up with more realistic timelines.
  • Take some time. Recharging your battery will ultimately serve you and your company better. Get plenty of rest, decompress by taking walks during your lunch break, or take a personal day if you really need one.
  • Explore flexible work arrangements. Your company may be willing to offer telecommuting or other options that may help provide work/life balance. Cutting your commute a couple of times a week can help shorten your workday.
  • Ignore the rumors. With so many workers fearing for their jobs, it’s difficult not to talk about it. However, you’ll be less stressed out about it if you try to avoid office speculation and just focus on the work at hand.

 

Source: CareerBuilder.com.

 

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