And You Thought Your Boss Was Bad


One boss took a bite of someone’s doughnut while they were away from their desk, another showed everyone a kidney stone he had passed, and a third declared “Talk Like a Pirate Day.”

While these might sound like scenes from the TV show The Office, they all really happened, according to a CareerBuilder.com survey about bad boss behavior.

In response, CareerBuilder.com developed a free Web site that lets workers who are dealing with problem bosses provide them constructive criticism, or just fun advice, anonymously. The site, www.anonymoustipgiver.com, allows users to select from one of four outlandish characters and several unique voices to deliver a custom message, which is delivered by e-mail.

CareerBuilder.com’s survey found women (48%) are more likely to quit because of a bad boss than men (39%). Age also plays a role in who stays and who goes. Approximately 48% of workers ages 35 to 44 left their jobs because of a bad boss, while 40% of younger workers, ages 18 to 24, and 41% of older workers, ages 45 to 54, said they quit.

Source: CareerBuilder.com, www.careerbuilder.com.

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