Things Your Web Site Should Contain



1 | Your firm’s specialties—for instance, corporate, individual, partnerships, taxes, bankruptcy, audits or estates.

2 | Your contact information on every page, including headquarters as well as any offices located in other cities, states or countries.

3 | States where you are licensed, in case a client has multiple offices or residences—inside, as well as outside, the United States.

4 | The types of clients on which you concentrate.

5 | Profiles of your firm’s members and languages in which they are fluent.

6 | Affiliations or links your firm has—professional, local and national.

7 | Examples of how you’ve solved specific problems (no names).

8 | FAQs for clients’ questions and concerns.

9 | “Tickler system” to remind clients of tax and other financial deadlines.

10 | A Web page to give potential clients an opportunity to contact you directly online and a map of the location of your office(s).

Source: Margot W. Teleki, CopyWrite LLC, Chatham, N.J., .


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