Preventing Flu at Work


ON THE JOB

lu, which is in season from October to May, is a leading cause of employee absenteeism, costing employers millions of dollars. The single best way to prevent flu is to get a flu vaccination. The Centers for Disease Control recommends getting the vaccine by November, but says December is not too late. Employers can encourage flu shots by having a health care provider make them available on-site. There are two types of vaccines: shots and a nasal-spray.

Even if you have received a flu vaccine—and especially if you have not—keep in mind the following preventative measures:

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick, too.

Stay home when you are sick and encourage your employees and coworkers to do the same.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.

Wash your hands often with soap to help protect yourself from germs.

Avoid spreading germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth with your hands.

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Maxim Health Systems.

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