Can the New CD-R Last 300 Years?

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

I just read about a new CD-R (recordable) from Kodak that is supposed to safely store data for 300 years. I’m aware that a conventional CD-R’s surface oxidizes, making it unreliable after about 10 years. So what’s your take on this 300-year claim?

Your guess is as good as mine. Kodak is a reliable company. It says a 24-karat gold surface protects the surface against oxidation and that it tested the product by accelerating the aging process. I guess the only irrefutable way to test the claim is to wait 300 years.

Short of that, I play it safe by skipping CD-Rs for long-term data storage. In addition to the oxidation risk, they are susceptible to surface scratches (even with a gold surface). I prefer to store my data on removable (remote) hard disks—and even then I opt to replace them every few years as technology advances.

SPONSORED REPORT

Get your clients ready for tax season

These year-end tax planning strategies address recent tax law changes enacted to help taxpayers deal with the pandemic, such as tax credits for sick leave and family leave and new rules for retirement plan distributions, as well as techniques for putting your clients in the best possible tax position.

RESOURCES

Keeping you informed and prepared amid the coronavirus crisis

We’re gathering the latest news stories along with relevant columns, tips, podcasts, and videos on this page, along with curated items from our archives to help with uncertainty and disruption.