User Hidden Text

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Q. I want to be able to place some sensitive commentary in a memo to clients in a way that only my partners will be able to read, and I guess Hidden text is the obvious way to do it. However, I’m afraid to apply it because there may be subtleties in its use and I would hate for our commentaries to become public. Can you provide some guidance?

A. I can help, but a word of caution is in order: I think using Hidden text for such an application would be imprudent. Accidents happen, and you may just forget to change a default switch. That could be embarrassing. Even more likely, what if the client, for one reason or another, checks the Hidden text radio button on his or her own computer so that all the hidden text will show? As a general rule, I always leave that box checked just in case there is hidden text in a document.

As you’ve probably surmised by now, Hidden text has two controls. The first comes on when it’s created, which is under Format , Font . Highlight the text you want hidden and place a check in the Hidden box.

If you want all hidden text to show in any document displayed on your computer, click on Tools , Options , the View tab and under the Formatting marks section place a check next to Hidden text .

The next thing you should know is how to find the hidden text if your computer is not defaulted to show it. The easiest way is with Find and Replace , which you evoke by pressing Ctrl+H. Once the Find and Replace screen opens, go to the bottom and click on the down arrow next to Format and then on the down arrow next to Font , which opens the Find Font screen. Place a check next to Hidden (see screenshot at right).

Click on Find Next and it will track down all the hidden text.

 

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