A More Convenient Way to Add Signatures in Outlook


Q. I use the signature feature in Outlook to sign my e-mails, and while it’s OK, it’s not the most convenient system when I want to use a less formal signature at the end of a message. Do you have any suggestions?

A. Indeed, I do. I also don’t like Outlook’s signature feature for the same reason. While you can establish many different signatures, changing the default signature takes several steps: You have to click on Tools , Options , the Mail Format tab and then choose your options at Signature for new messages or at Signature for replies and forwards .

A much better way, because it’s fast and easy—is to use the AutoCorrect Options . After writing an e-mail message, I type a coded abbreviation ( zz for example) and the signature appears.

Stanley Zarowin
Journal of Accountancy

To set up an AutoCorrect code, type the signature you want; if you want it in a special font, format it accordingly. Then highlight the signature and go to the toolbar and click on Tools , AutoCorrect Options . In the box under Replace , type a code—in this case I typed zz —and in the box under With , your highlighted signature (or anything else you highlight) will appear.

Be sure to check the box labeled Replace text as you type and then click on OK .

Now, any time you type zz and hit Enter, your custom signature will appear instead. Obviously, you can use the AutoCorrect Options anywhere you use Word—for signatures or boilerplate text.

RESOURCES

Keeping you informed and prepared amid the coronavirus outbreak

We’re gathering the latest news stories along with relevant columns, tips, podcasts, and videos on this page, along with curated items from our archives to help with uncertainty and disruption.

VIDEO

Excel walk-through: Sparklines

Want to liven up your spreadsheets with some color and graphical elements? Kelly L. Williams, CPA, Ph.D., shows how to use Excel sparklines, which illustrate data trends and patterns via small charts that fit in a single Excel cell.