Track Editing Changes in Excel


Q. Word has a convenient tool under Tools called Track Changes . I remember in the old days we called that function red lining and it kept track of every change made in a document and then let us choose whether we wanted to keep the changes. I wish we could do that in Excel.

A. You can. In fact, it works the same way and you’ll find it in the same place in Excel—under Tools .

When you edit a cell in the Track Changes mode, Excel outlines the cell in blue and puts a blue triangle in the upper-left corner. And when you position the mouse pointer over the edited cell, Excel displays a comment indicating what change was made.

To launch Track Changes , click on Tools and then Track Changes . That brings up this menu:

When you’re ready to determine which changes to finally accept, click on Track Changes and on Accept or Reject Changes and you will be offered this menu:

After you’re done Excel still shows edited cells with the blue border and tracking changes indicator. The only way to get rid of them is to turn off Track Changes by going back into it through the Tools menu and unchecking the box.

Be aware that Excel is keeping track of only the last edit made. If you want a complete history of changes, you must instruct Excel to keep a complete tracking history on a separate revisions worksheet. To do that place a check in the box List changes on a new sheet.


6 key areas of change for accountants and auditors

New accounting standards on revenue recognition, leases, and credit losses present implementation challenges. This independently-written report identifies the hurdles that accounting professionals face and provides tips for overcoming the challenges.


How tax reform will impact individual taxpayers

Amy Wang, a CPA who is a senior technical manager for tax advocacy at the AICPA, answers to some of the most common questions on how the new tax reform law will impact individual taxpayers.