Outlook Provides Travel Instructions

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Key to Instructions

To help readers follow the instructions in this article, we use two different typefaces.

Boldface type is used to identify the names of icons, agendas and URLs.

Sans serif type indicates commands and instructions that users should type into the computer and the names of files.


Q. I spend lots of time traveling to new clients—and often get lost. A colleague told me there was a great way to link a client’s address in Outlook to the Internet and that would give me travel directions with the click of a mouse. Is there any truth to that?

A. I know it sounds like science fiction, but your colleague gave you a good tip. Here’s how to do it. In Outlook, click on Contacts and then, if you don’t already have your client’s postal address listed (with the ZIP code), click on New and fill in the information.

To demonstrate how it’s done, I’ve entered President George W. Bush’s address at the White House in my Outlook’s Contact section (see right).

Notice in the toolbar on the top of the screen there is a yellow and black icon resembling a road sign. Click on it and Outlook will open your Internet link and connect you to Microsoft Expedia Maps where a map of the area surrounding your target address will appear (see below).

As you can see from the options on the screen, that single mouse click gives you the ability to, among other things, print the map, get detailed driving directions or find a nearby hotel.

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