Employee Benefits

U.S. companies will pay on average 15.4% more in 2003 to provide their workers with health insurance than they did this year, when rates climbed 13.7%, says consulting group Hewitt Associates ( http://was.hewitt.com/hewitt ). Some corporations will absorb most of the increase, but others will ask employees to contribute more than in the past. Next year, workers will pay on average 19% of the cost of their own coverage and 24% of dependent care premiums. Hewitt bases its projections on information from more than 2,000 U.S. health plans.


6 key areas of change for accountants and auditors

New accounting standards on revenue recognition, leases, and credit losses present implementation challenges. This independently-written report identifies the hurdles that accounting professionals face and provides tips for overcoming the challenges.


How tax reform will impact individual taxpayers

Amy Wang, a CPA who is a senior technical manager for tax advocacy at the AICPA, answers to some of the most common questions on how the new tax reform law will impact individual taxpayers.