Accountants Should Not Discriminate

BY NEIL D. FRIEDMAN

The author of “A Nice Niche—If You Minimize Liability Risk” ( JofA, Feb.01, page 49) warns practitioners to accept only the most ethical and upright potential clients. Similar advice is commonly given to auditors. The result is that the most experienced, resourceful accountants service the most solid, trusted clients. In contrast, less established or inexperienced practitioners provide services to unproven and unstable concerns.

From an experienced accountant’s point of view, making distinctions between clients may be considered wise, but I believe it could be detrimental to society as a whole. Almost any accountant can audit or provide other accounting services to the archdiocese. The public benefits when the most experienced accountants serve the questionable operators as well.

Neil D. Friedman, CPA
Boulder, Colorado

SPONSORED REPORT

2018 financial reporting survey: Challenges and trends

Learn the top reporting challenges that emerged in a survey of more than 800 finance, accounting, and compliance professionals across the world, and compare them with your organization's obstacles.

PODCAST

How the skill set for today’s CFO is changing

Scott Simmons, a search expert for large-company CFOs, gives advice for the next generation of finance leaders and more, including which universities are regularly producing future CEOs and CFOs.