More On Spreadsheet Headers

If you tried to follow Monika Smith’s alternative way to create a faux header in Excel ( JofA, Oct.00, page 122 ) and it didn’t work, don’t blame yourself or Smith. I misstated one small—but significant—instruction. In the final step, where you fill in the info-type box, don’t enter the file’s path and file name. Instead, type filename .

For those who want to use that technique, Smith suggests a shortcut adopted by her firm, Grant Thornton, which often uses the same spreadsheet setup for different clients or even creates master spreadsheets. Simply evoke Save As to store it in a different folder with a different file name. If the original spreadsheet came with the file name function entered in a cell, all you have to is double-click that cell and Excel automatically updates the file path.

But if you want a real header—not one that’s included in a cell, you can get a free add-in at

Do you have a technology question for this column? Send it to Senior Editor Stanley Zarowin via e-mail at or regular mail at the Journal of Accountancy, Harborside Financial Center, 201 Plaza Three, Jersey City, NJ 07311-3881. We regret that we cannot answer letters individually. If a reader’s question is deemed to have sufficiently broad interest, we will answer it in a forthcoming Technology Q&A column.

—The editors


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