Disturbed by Editor's Note

BY EDWIN J. KLIEGMAN

The October 1998 issue of the Journal of Accountancy contained a letter from Eli Mason, "Questioning Change" (page 114), which was critical of a speech by AICPA President Barry Melancon, as well as other policies of the Institute. The letter was followed by an editor's note.

I find it disturbing that when someone writes a letter critical of the AICPA and its policies and it is published, the letter is sometimes, selectively, followed by an editor's note that attempts to deflect and diminish its intent.

In the case in point, the editor's note states, "The thousands of AICPA members who participated in the visioning process said that the issue is how to change." It perhaps should have been pointed out that about 3,000 out of a membership of over 330,000 participated in the visioning process. Hardly a majority, I dare say.

But, that's not the point; letters to the editor should not be responded to unless there is a material misstatement of fact. Opinions should not be responded to by the editor merely because they differ from the opinions of the Institute management.

Edwin J. Kliegman, CPA
Massapequa Park, New York

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