When is a leap year not a leap year? Smart stops on ...




The Other Year 2000 Problem

Every CPA should be aware by now of the possible problems as computer systems head to January 1, 2000 (commonly referred to as the Year 2000 issue). However, there is another adjustment that has to be made—one that was last addressed in 1600. An exception to the quadrennial leap year rule occurs in century years to adjust for small changes. Therefore, 1700, 1800 and 1900 were not leap years. However, century years divisible by 400, such as the Year 2000, are exceptions to the exception: These are leap years.

This calendar adjustment could affect any programs that calculate interest over the course of a year, for example. Accountants may want to make sure any calendar programs recognize February 29, 2000, as a valid date.



Where to find January’s flipbook issue

Starting this month, all Association magazines — the Journal of Accountancy, The Tax Adviser, and FM magazine (coming in February) — are completely digital. Read more about the change and get tips on how to access the new flipbook digital issues.

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Get your clients ready for tax season

Upon its enactment in March, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) introduced many new tax changes, some of which retroactively affected 2020 returns. Making the right moves now can help you mitigate any surprises heading into 2022.