Web Lookup for Recovery Payments Coming Soon; Automated Phone Service Now Available


The IRS has established an automated telephone service to confirm whether taxpayers received an economic recovery payment in 2009. The Service also said on its Web site that it will provide a Web-based service, “Did I Receive a 2009 Economic Recovery Payment?” for looking up the information, starting March 23.

 

The automated telephone number, 866-234-2942 (option 1), requires taxpayers to provide their Social Security number, date of birth and ZIP code from their most recently filed tax return.

 

In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided for $250 stimulus payments to most U.S. residents receiving Social Security benefits, supplemental security income, railroad retirement benefits or veterans’ pensions or disability compensation. But so far this filing season, no lookup service has been available. Instead, the IRS has directed taxpayers and preparers to call toll-free numbers for the Social Security Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs and Railroad Retirement Board to confirm the payments.

 

If eligible taxpayers did not receive an economic recovery payment, they may claim the $250 government retiree credit on new Schedule M for Form 1040. The payment or credit reduces dollar for dollar the amount taxpayers may claim for the making work pay credit.

 

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