Professor receives highest AICPA honor in tax


Annette Nellen received the 2013 Arthur J. Dixon Memorial Award, the highest honor bestowed by the accounting profession in the area of taxation. 

The award, given annually by the AICPA Tax Division, is named in honor of Arthur J. Dixon, a CPA who had an outstanding record of service to the tax profession and to the Tax Division. 

Nellen is a professor in San José State University’s graduate tax program. Earlier in her career she worked at Ernst & Young, at the IRS, and in industry. She has testified before the House Ways & Means Committee, the Senate Finance Committee, and other commissions and committees on federal and state tax reform, and she served on the academic panel that advised the Joint Committee on Taxation staff for the tax law simplification study submitted to Congress in 2001.

Nellen has been an AICPA volunteer for more than 20 years, chairing and serving on various tax committees, and she has written hundreds of articles (including articles for the AICPA’s Tax Insider newsletter and The Tax Adviser) and participated in more than 250 presentations to professional organizations and community groups. She also maintains the 21st Century Taxation website and blog, as well as several websites on tax reform, state tax nexus, and e-commerce taxation.

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