Former AICPA president dies


Former AICPA President Philip B. Chenok died Feb. 12 at the age of 77.

Chenok, who was one of the most influential executives in the AICPA’s history, served as president of the Institute from 1980 to 1995. He led the organization during an eventful period that included the implementation of the Plan to Restructure Professional Standards, which strengthened self-regulation in the profession. During his tenure, the organization also dealt with a liability crisis that led to a battle to secure legislation against frivolous lawsuits.

Chenok was a partner at Main Hurdman & Cranstoun before taking over as president at the AICPA. He had plenty of prior experience with the organization, including serving as chairman of the Institute’s Auditing Standards Board and its predecessor, the Auditing Standards Executive Committee, from 1976 to 1979.

Chenok, a New York City native whose father also was an accountant, graduated from New York University in 1957. He started his career in public accounting on the audit staff of a small CPA firm called Pogson, Peloubet & Co., which was in the city’s financial district. He later received an MBA from NYU’s Graduate School of Business.

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