A bit confusing

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS, CPA

Q: When installing Office 2013 on my 64-bit computer running a 64-bit operating system, the Microsoft installation routine recommends installing the 32-bit version of Office 2013, but it also provides the 64-bit option of Office 2013, which seems to be the more obvious option. Which do you recommend and why?

A: It is true that the Microsoft Office 2013 installation routine recommends you install the 32-bit version, but the installation routine’s small print explains this recommendation. The 32-bit version is compatible with 32-bit add-ons and plug-ins, whereas the 64-bit is not. Additionally, the 64-bit version does not support the ActiveX controls library (which contains ActiveX controls used to build solutions commonly used in Access, Excel, and Word), or SharePoint list controls. If these items are nonissues for you, then installing the 64-bit version of Office 2013 is the better option. The advantage of running the 64-bit version is support for larger files, faster performance, and superior bragging rights at cocktail parties.

SPONSORED REPORT

How to make the most of a negotiation

Negotiators are made, not born. In this sponsored report, we cover strategies and tactics to help you head into 2017 ready to take on business deals, salary discussions and more.

VIDEO

Will the Affordable Care Act be repealed?

The results of the 2016 presidential election are likely to have a big impact on federal tax policy in the coming years. Eddie Adkins, CPA, a partner in the Washington National Tax Office at Grant Thornton, discusses what parts of the ACA might survive the repeal of most of the law.

COLUMN

Deflecting clients’ requests for defense and indemnity

Client requests for defense and indemnity by the CPA firm are on the rise. Requests for such clauses are unnecessary and unfair, and, in some cases, are unenforceable.