The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) implemented a revised set of accounting accreditation standards on July 1—the first major changes to the standards in nearly a decade.

The new standards, which cover everything from strategic management to learning and teaching, were approved at the AACSB’s annual business meeting in Chicago in April and are available at The revisions reduced the number of accounting accreditation standards from 15 to 10 by eliminating duplicated and overlapping standards, according to Jerry Trapnell, special adviser to the president/CEO of the AACSB. Despite the reduction, Trapnell said the changes have made the accreditation process more vigorous.

Changes in the standards place focus in three areas:

  • Innovation, such as creative curricula and new program concepts;
  • Professional and academic engagement (including an emphasis on active learning); and
  • Documenting the impact of educational initiatives and research outcomes to help promote accountability.

A total of 672 institutions around the world hold AACSB business school accreditation, and 178 of those also have accounting accreditation from the AACSB. Accreditation is a voluntary process that schools undertake to show that they hold themselves to a high set of standards.


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