A super footnote reference

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS

Q: We’d like to print our financial statements from Excel, but we can’t get the footnote references to appear the way we would like. We want to display the footnote references in the superscript format, but to do this we have to enter the footnote reference in a different column, and this results in a wide gap between the row description and footnote reference. As far as I can tell, below are the two options we have when printing from Excel, neither of which is suitable.

Because of this problem, we take the extra steps of copying and pasting the financial statements into Word, then edit the financial report further before printing. Is there a way to use superscripting and eliminate the gap between the row description and the footnote reference at the same time, without having to copy and paste the financial statement into Word?

A: Excel allows you to format each character in a given cell individually, and this trick can be used to achieve the result you desire. To accomplish this, enter the row description and footnote reference into the same cell. Highlight the cell and activate edit mode (by pressing the F2 key or by double-clicking the cell). Use the mouse (or the arrow keys while holding down the Shift key) to highlight the footnote reference portion of the text (see below).

Next, right-click on the cell to display the pop-up menu and select Format Cells. Click the Superscript checkbox, and click OK. As pictured below, this action will display the footnote reference in superscript format, like Word does.

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