Clipboard on Steroids

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS

Q: I found the tip in the May 2011 issue of the JofA for pasting a cell’s content multiple times to be very helpful (“Pasting Away Again,” page 72), but my situation is more complicated. When working in Excel, I need to copy and paste multiple sources of content (account numbers, dates, names, inventory IDs, etc.) to multiple cell locations. The best answer I have come up with is to copy and paste the data to a scratch worksheet, and then constantly refer to that scratch worksheet to copy and paste the content back to the various cell locations. Is there a better approach?

 

A: In Office 2003, Clipboard automatically remembered the last 24 images and text you copied, and presented them to you for pasting. Office 2007 and 2010 can do this, too, but by default, these Office editions only remember the last text or image copied. You can change the global default setting in any Office 2007 or 2010 product from the Home tab, by clicking the Show the Office Clipboard Task Pane button located to the right of the Clipboard group label, as circled in the Word 2010 example below.

 

Next, click the Options button located at the bottom of the Clipboard dialog box and check the option labeled Collect Without Showing Office Clipboard, then close Clipboard.

 

Thereafter, as you copy text or images in Word, Excel, PowerPoint or other Microsoft applications, Clipboard will accumulate all copied text and images. Later, when you are ready to paste any of the last 24 items you have copied, launch Clipboard (as described above) and click any of the 24 previously copied text or image items to paste them into your application (see below).

 

 

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