One Tall Solution


Q: When printing large worksheets in Excel 2003, is there an easy trick to figuring out how many pages tall the print job needs to be to ensure that my worksheet prints out as wide as possible on the page, but no wider? I usually set the page width to one page, and then use the trial-and-error method to figure out how many pages tall the print job needs to be.


A: Yes, there is an easy solution. Leave the tall box blank in Page Setup, and Excel will automatically calculate the number of pages tall the report needs to be to print your worksheet based on the number of pages wide you specify.


Note: The Excel 2010 and 2007 Print dialog boxes both provide the menu option Fit All Columns on One Page that accomplishes the same result.


More from the JofA:

 Find us on Facebook  |   Follow us on Twitter  |   View JofA videos


Year-end tax planning and what’s new for 2016

Practitioners need to consider several tax planning opportunities to review with their clients before the end of the year. This report offers strategies for individuals and businesses, as well as recent federal tax law changes affecting this year’s tax returns.


News quiz: Retirement planning, tax practice, and fraud risk

Recent reports focused on a survey that gauges the worries about retirement among CPA financial planners’ clients, a suit that affects tax practitioners, and a guide that offers advice on fraud risk. See how much you know with this short quiz.


Bolster your data defenses

As you weather the dog days of summer, it’s a good time to make sure your cybersecurity structure can stand up to the heat of external and internal threats. Here are six steps to help shore up your systems.