Peters Wins Medal of Honor

Aulana L. Peters, a retired partner with the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP in Los Angeles, received the AICPA’s 2010 Medal of Honor.


Olivia F. Kirtley, chair of the AICPA’s Awards Committee, presented the award at the fall meeting of the Institute’s governing Council.


The Medal of Honor, the AICPA’s highest honor presented to a non-CPA, is awarded to an individual whose work has influenced the profession significantly.


Peters served as a public member of the Institute’s board of directors, governing Council and as a member of the Public Oversight Board, and on its Blue Ribbon Panel on Audit Effectiveness.


She was also a member of the Steering Committee for FASB’s Financial Reporting Project.


Peters was the first African American to serve as a commissioner of the SEC, where she took a particular interest in the accounting profession’s role in capital markets.


She is a member of the Public Interest Oversight Board for the International Federation of Accountants and of the Accountability Advisory Council to the U.S. Comptroller General. She also is a member of the board of directors at Deere & Co., Northrop Grumman Corp. and 3M, and is a member of the Mayo Clinic board of trustees.


More from the JofA:


 Find us on Facebook      Follow us on Twitter


Year-end tax planning and what’s new for 2016

Practitioners need to consider several tax planning opportunities to review with their clients before the end of the year. This report offers strategies for individuals and businesses, as well as recent federal tax law changes affecting this year’s tax returns.


News quiz: Retirement planning, tax practice, and fraud risk

Recent reports focused on a survey that gauges the worries about retirement among CPA financial planners’ clients, a suit that affects tax practitioners, and a guide that offers advice on fraud risk. See how much you know with this short quiz.


Bolster your data defenses

As you weather the dog days of summer, it’s a good time to make sure your cybersecurity structure can stand up to the heat of external and internal threats. Here are six steps to help shore up your systems.