Add the File and Path to a Document or Worksheet So You Can Find It Easier Later

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Q When I review a paper copy of a worksheet or a document that I prepared some time ago, I’m forever searching around my computer for where I saved it on my hard drive. Is there a way to automatically insert the name and path of the document so it always will appear on the printed version? That way I could always track it down easily.

 

A Many users frequently insert that data in either a header or footer. For instructions on how to insert the information that way, see “A Handy Guide for Creating Custom Headers and Footers” (May 09, page 77). But if you want more options about where to insert the file name and path, here are some suggestions.

 

In Excel, you can add that information to show in a cell by typing this formula in the cell: =CELL(“filename”)

 

To place the file ID anywhere in a Word document, first position the insertion point where you want the data to appear. In Word 2007, open the Insert tab and click on Quick Parts in the Text group and choose Field (see screenshot below).

 

In Word 2003, click on Field under the Insert menu.

 

Then choose Document Information from the Categories list (top left corner of the dialog box) and select FileName from the Field names list and click on the Field Codes button at the bottom of the screen.

 

Then click on OK and Word modifies the display of the dialog box. Now click on Options, which then displays the Field Options dialog box, and click on the Field Specific Switches tab (see screenshot below) and select the p option to include the path of the file name to be inserted in the field. Then click on Add to Field and on OK twice.

 

 

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