Small Business


The U.S. Small Business Administration reached a three-year agreement to expand and deliver entrepreneurship training for service-disabled veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

The SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development will support the expansion of the year-long Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) with partners including Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Management; the University of Connecticut School of Business; Mays Business School at Texas A&M; UCLA Anderson School of Management; Florida State University’s College of Business; and the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University. SBA grants and other assistance will significantly expand the reach and impact of the EBV initiative and help maximize economic opportunities for U.S. veterans with disabilities.

 

The SBA also launched a new online contracting tutorial at sba.gov, as part of its ongoing efforts to expand services to veterans and service-disabled veterans. Veterans and military spouses who own small businesses can use this free online course to learn how to identify and take advantage of federal contracting opportunities.

 

This initiative builds on the SBA’s support for veterans through its Patriot Express loan program. In two-and-a-half years, the pilot loan initiative has supported nearly $400 million in loans to more than 4,700 veterans and spouses looking to establish or expand small businesses. The number of Patriot Express loans increased by more than 20% in 2009 compared with 2008. Details are available at sba.gov/patriotexpress.

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