AICPA Awards Scholarships


The Institute announced the winners of the AICPA/Accountemps Student Scholarship and the John L. Carey Scholarship.

 

The AICPA/Accountemps Student Scholarship is awarded to accounting, finance or information systems majors with a minimum 3.0 grade-point average who demonstrate leadership, academic excellence and future career interests in accounting and business. The AICPA administers the program, and Accountemps funds the $2,500 individual scholarships. The 2009 winners are:

 

  • Trever Campbell, University of Oregon
  • Laurie Corradino, Colorado State University, Pueblo
  • Timothy Hammond, Le Moyne College, N.Y.
  • Adam Keene, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Jessica Nigl, University of Iowa

 

The John L. Carey Scholarship is awarded to liberal arts degree holders with little or no accounting education experience who are pursuing graduate studies in accounting and intend to sit for the Uniform CPA Examination. Each 2009 winner received a $5,000 scholarship from the AICPA Foundation:

 

  • Michael Behr, University of Rochester, N.Y.
  • Lawrence Braithwaite, Harvard University, Mass.
  • John Enders, Wake Forest University, N.C.
  • Travis Fry, University of Texas at Austin
  • Lindsey Johnson, University of Texas at Austin
  • Jennifer Marenberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • David Mills, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Katherine Sartoski, Texas A&M University
  • Rhett Taylor, Vanderbilt University, Tenn.
  • Wei Zhang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

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