Discover the Power and Convenience of Office Clipboard

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

When I copy something in Word, say, with Ctrl+C, and then move on to edit and even copy material in some other part of my document, is there a way to retrieve the snippets I copied for later use?

Absolutely. The tool you need to exploit is the Office Clipboard, one of the handiest—and most underused—tools in the Microsoft toolkit. Notice its full name is Office Clipboard—because it works in combination with all Office applications. And what makes it so handy is that it also works with most third-party apps, too. For example, as the exhibit at left shows, I copied something from a Word document, an Excel spreadsheet, an Outlook e-mail, the online edition of The New York Times, and even the graphic program that created this screenshot.

Every time you copy something, it automatically loads into Clipboard. To reproduce any of those snippets, just go to an application of your choice, place your cursor where you want it to be copied and then click on the target snippet. Presto! It’s placed there.

You can copy a Word snippet into Excel or vice versa.

Of course, Clipboard is handy only if it’s always available. So I recommend placing it in your toolbar. To do that, click on Tools, Customize, the Commands tab, and then move down to its icon in the Edit column and drag it to your toolbar.

To complete the setup to make the Clipboard handy, click on Options at the bottom of the tool (see screenshot below) and place checks next to the tasks that suit your needs.

In Office 2007 the Clipboard switch is right at your fingertips at the left edge of the Home ribbon (see screenshot below).

SPONSORED REPORT

How to make the most of a negotiation

Negotiators are made, not born. In this sponsored report, we cover strategies and tactics to help you head into 2017 ready to take on business deals, salary discussions and more.

VIDEO

Will the Affordable Care Act be repealed?

The results of the 2016 presidential election are likely to have a big impact on federal tax policy in the coming years. Eddie Adkins, CPA, a partner in the Washington National Tax Office at Grant Thornton, discusses what parts of the ACA might survive the repeal of most of the law.

COLUMN

Deflecting clients’ requests for defense and indemnity

Client requests for defense and indemnity by the CPA firm are on the rise. Requests for such clauses are unnecessary and unfair, and, in some cases, are unenforceable.