Outlook Has a "Sticky-Note" Function

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

OUTLOOK HAS A "STICKY-NOTE" FUNCTION
 Is there a way in Microsoft Office to create a “sticky-note”— that is, a note I can stick on my desktop? I’ve seen ads for third-party sticky-note applications; but before I go out and buy one, I wonder whether such a function is hidden somewhere in Microsoft Office.

 Your wondering is right on target: The sticky-note function is camouflaged under a few screens in Outlook (both XP and 2007). What makes the Outlook note very special is that you can stick it to Outlook (calendars or e-mail lists) and to the screens of any application in your computer or on the desktop.

To create a note, open Outlook and click on File, point to New and click on Note (see screenshot below). A faster way: Ctrl+Shift+N.

A small window will appear where you can type your note (see screenshot at left); and if you click on the tiny note image in the upper left, you have several options, including coloring the note and forwarding it (see screenshot at left), or you can store it in your taskbar (see screenshot below)…

 


 

…and evoke it with a click or stick it on your desktop (see screenshot below).

When you switch screens—say from the Outlook calendar to a Web site or some other application—the note may disappear from the screen but remain in the taskbar as an icon. Click on the icon, and it will reappear.

 

 

 

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