Signing Bonuses Lure Recent Grads


More entry-level hires may find themselves with deeper pockets in 2008, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

The association's Job Outlook 2008 survey found 54% of employers plan to use signing bonuses when recruiting new hires, up from 47% in 2007.

Previous NACE studies and surveys suggest that employers often underestimate their need to use signing bonuses. According to Marilyn Mackes, NACE executive director, approximately 47% of employers said they planned to offer bonuses in 2007, but more than 54% actually used them. If the pattern holds, Mackes expects more than 60% of employers could use bonuses when hiring 2008 graduates.

Respondents who planned to offer a bonus to all entry-level hires expected to spend on average $4,450 per bonus - a 25% increase from 2007.

The survey found that two-thirds of employers using bonuses only expect to offer them to select candidates, and the amount of the bonus varies depending on several factors, including degree subject and level.

Source: Job Outlook 2008 , www.naceweb.org.

<% server.execute /pubs/jofa/includes/footer.htm %>

SPONSORED REPORT

How the election may affect taxation of business income

This report summarizes recent proposals to reform the U.S. business income tax system and considers the path to enactment of any such legislation.

VIDEO

How to Excel pivot a general ledger

The general ledger is a vast historical data archive of your company's financial activities, including revenue, expenses, adjustments, and account balances. J. Carlton Collins, CPA, shows how to prepare data for, and mine data with, PivotTables.

QUIZ

Did you follow 2016’s biggest accounting news?

CPAs will remember 2016 as a year of new standards and new faces. How well did you follow the biggest accounting events? The 7 questions in this quiz will help you find out