Create a Custom Envelope

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN


I’d like to print customized envelopes for our practice. Is there some easy way I can do that?

 

I wouldn’t dismiss Word’s envelope function. It’s very useful and can be customized easily by clicking on the Options button (see screenshots).

 

But if you want even more customization—such as an added graphic —I suggest creating a template that can be evoked with a single click. Here’s how:

Open a blank document and click on File, Page Setup and under the Margins tab change the Orientation to Landscape. Then click on the Paper tab and cursor down to Com-10 (for commercial #10 envelope) or to the envelope size you prefer. If you don’t see the envelope size you want, select Custom and enter its height and width. Then set the margins. If you should happen to set them too small, Word will warn you, and if you click on Fix, it will make the proper adjustments.

Then type your return address in the upper-left corner. To add a picture or a graphic design, click on Insert, Picture, From File and navigate to it. Then highlight the graphic and click on Insert (see screenshot).

Caution: Since you want the envelope to be easily accessible, don’t let Word automatically save the template to the default location for all templates—hidden deep among the many folders in C:Documents and Settings. Instead, use the Save in box (see screenshot below) to navigate to the Desktop, where you can access the envelope with a click.

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