Make Your Own Turn-Off Button—and More

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN


It’s so silly that I have to click on Start to get to the command to end my session on my computer. As if that’s not enough, I then have to select from a menu to either Stand By , Turn Off or Restart . Why isn’t there a simple turn-off button?

If all you want is a turn-off button, that’s easy. I can give you more.

Not only will I give you a turn-off switch, I’ll raise you two: I’ll show you how to create three buttons—a one-step turn off, a one-step quick restart and an emergency button to abort those commands if you suddenly change your mind after clicking on one of them.

Let’s begin with the one-step turn-off or shutdown command. Right-click on your desktop and then click on New , Shortcut (see screenshot).

When the screen wizard asks you to Type the location of the item , type shutdown –s –t 0 . Be sure to include the spaces as shown; the last digit is a zero and there is no period at the end.

Then click on Next , and when you’re asked to Type a name for this shortcut , give it something unambiguous, like Shutdown , so you don’t click on it by accident. Then click Finish .

I suggest you also give it an unambiguous icon, so you can find it easily on your desktop. To do that, right-click on the new shortcut and choose Properties and then click on Change Icon . That will trigger a large collection of icons. Click on any one and then on OK and OK again. Here’s what mine looks like:

To create the quick restart, follow the same steps only the command line is shutdown –r –t 0 .

If you find the commands occur too quickly—and you want more time so you can reconsider your action—you can slow it down by adjusting the –t 0 at the end of the command line. For example, if you change the command to –t 10 , it will initiate within 10 seconds. If you remove the –t switch entirely, it will quit in 30 seconds.

And finally, to create the abort switch, use this formula: shutdown –a . But, of course, you have to hit that switch before the –t switch kicks in.

SPONSORED REPORT

How the election may affect taxation of business income

This report summarizes recent proposals to reform the U.S. business income tax system and considers the path to enactment of any such legislation.

VIDEO

How to Excel pivot a general ledger

The general ledger is a vast historical data archive of your company's financial activities, including revenue, expenses, adjustments, and account balances. J. Carlton Collins, CPA, shows how to prepare data for, and mine data with, PivotTables.

QUIZ

Did you follow 2016’s biggest accounting news?

CPAs will remember 2016 as a year of new standards and new faces. How well did you follow the biggest accounting events? The 7 questions in this quiz will help you find out