Set Sequenced Due Dates


I prepare spreadsheets that list various due dates such as every Friday or every other Monday. Is there a fast way to do this?

Excel offers two choices. One uses simple formulas and the other applies Auto Fill Options.

Since dates that are a week apart are separated by seven days, the general formula is: =A1+7 where A1 is the starting date. Be sure to set the cells to the date format beforehand (see screenshot, below).

Then copy the formula in as many cells as you need. If you need a two-week spread, change the 7 in the formula to 14.

To set the schedule with the Auto Fill Options method, place a pair of one-week-apart dates in two adjoining cells and then right-click on the lower right corner of the cell with the later date (see screenshot, below).

Note: Don’t worry if a right-click on the corner of the cell fails to generate the drop-down menu shown above. Simply dragging your cursor down the column for as many cells as you need will produce the properly sequenced dates just as well.




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