See Double on Command

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

I frequently need to view two Internet browser windows at the same time—for example, when I’m comparing results on two financial sites. Is there a way to do this?

Indeed there is. The technique, called tiling, can be done with any screen image, whether it’s from a browser or an application. For example, you can show a Word document on one part of the screen and an Excel spreadsheet right next to it or just below it (see the screenshot below for a double-browser view).

While it’s technically possible to show many screens simultaneously, as a practical matter four to six are the limit; beyond that, unless you have a giant screen and excellent vision, the images are too small to read.

To generate multiple images, open the screens (from your browser or an application) you want tiled and minimize them all at once by pressing Windows key+M or one at a time by clicking on the dash in the upper right-hand box (see screenshot below).

Minimizing the active windows puts you at the desktop, with the icons of the minimized windows showing in the taskbar (see screenshot below).

Now hold down the Ctrl key and right-click on each window, evoking the menu at right. Then select how you want it tiled—horizontally or vertically.

Once you have the images tiled on your screen, you can move them around by dragging them with your mouse or change their dimensions by nudging the screen edges with the mouse.

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