An Inca 1040?


Think accounting is the invention of modern minds? Not likely. Two Harvard researchers are convinced that ancient Incas tracked inventory and taxes through a three-tiered accounting system using knotted bundles of threads.
The researchersand many scholars pondering their reportbelieve the colorful knotted quipu strings found at a 13th century archaeological site near Lima, Peru, formed an early abacus system the Incas used to track the units of labor and time upon which taxes were based. The first two tiers of knots are double-entry accounts, they think, and the third is a summary of the numbers.

If their interpretation is accepted by the academic community, it will put to rest the Inca paradoxthe question of why these early Americans had the only complex empire with no written form of communication. They may have had no novels, it seems, but they did indeed have books.


Year-end tax planning and what’s new for 2016

Practitioners need to consider several tax planning opportunities to review with their clients before the end of the year. This report offers strategies for individuals and businesses, as well as recent federal tax law changes affecting this year’s tax returns.


News quiz: Retirement planning, tax practice, and fraud risk

Recent reports focused on a survey that gauges the worries about retirement among CPA financial planners’ clients, a suit that affects tax practitioners, and a guide that offers advice on fraud risk. See how much you know with this short quiz.


Bolster your data defenses

As you weather the dog days of summer, it’s a good time to make sure your cybersecurity structure can stand up to the heat of external and internal threats. Here are six steps to help shore up your systems.