Higher Pay=Longer Commute


How far would you travel for a high-paying job? Executives at the top of the pay scale have much longer commutes than the majority of U.S. workers, averaging 42.3 minutes compared with a national average of 24.3 minutes for rank-and-file employees. Part of the reason for this may be highly compensated workers can afford to live wherever they want.

For many executives, commuting time is a serious concern. Some 78% of respondents to a survey by TheLadders.com said they would make a career decision based on commute time. This is likely to be especially true in cities such as New York, Boston and Philadelphiawhere average commute times approach one hour.

Cars are still the preferred method of travel78% of those polled said they drive to work. Mass transit was a distant second at only 13%. Others walk, bicycle or even fly to reach the office.

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