Change The Case Of Text In Word-But Not In Excel

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Q. Is there some fast and easy way to change the case of text in Word and Excel?

A. You can in Word, but although many users desperately wish they could do it in Excel, I’m sorry to say, they can’t yet. I’ve seen some very complex macros written that are supposed to be effective, but none that I’ve tried works very well.

In Word, case changing is a snap. One way is to put the Change Case icon on your toolbar. To do that, click on Tools , Customize , click on the Commands tab, go to Format and then scroll down to Change Case . If you keep moving down, you’ll notice another Change Case icon: Next to it is an icon with three letter A s.

They both can do the job, but they do it in slightly different ways. Drag either the first Change Case or the triple A icon up to your toolbar.

If you choose Change Case , highlight the target text and click on Change Case ; the highlighted text will toggle among upper case, lower case, title case and sentence case. But if you select the triple As, this screen will pop up:

There still is one more way: After highlighting the target text, press Shift+F3; each time you press those buttons, it toggles the text among upper, lower and title case. It doesn’t do sentence case unless the highlighted text contains a period or semicolon.

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